Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 2 of 3)

super_bowl_2013 lrEvery one of the ads. If it was awesome, it’s here. If it sucked, it’s also here.

If you missed part 1, click here

What will part 2 have in store? Hopefully some better ads, the Baggage Cargo hold is getting crowded, while there is plenty of room in First Class…

21. Subway – A Story 15 Years in the Making

This ad is about a celebration, but somehow there’s something here that’s oddly…a little sad. Perhaps it’s the mental image of this poor guy Jared as some sort of human guinea-pig in a 15-year experiment, forced to eat low-fat Subway sandwiches every day to see if he can become a “claim” in a TV campaign.  It’s all a little off-putting. Don’t tell me the lone quick shot of him blowing out some candles doesn’t seem mildly pathetic, like they took him out of his cage briefly to blow a candle placed on top of a…6 inch ham, lettuce and tomato, no mayo or mustard please. There has to be more to life than that. And, sorry but I think even fast food lovers quake at the thought at eating at the same joint for 15 years. Wrong strategy Subway, that’s why the rest of the ad (celebrities, movie trailer-like setup) is completely forgettable. – Baggage Cargo Hold

22. Budweiser – Brotherhood

Bud has been running these Clydesdale ads for forever, and it has been about that long since they were any good. So I was all set to go to hate on this ad! But, despite my best efforts, it kind of got to me. The clearest lesson here is the importance of music. At times it’s almost as easy as cheating. I’ve heard it said that it can be 80% of the effect, and that applies here. You could put a monster truck highlight reel to the tune of Stevie Nicks singing “Changes”, and I would find it emotional. So there’s that. But I give them full credit. The story was cheesy, but heartwarming. The strong hook (music), the storytelling, the branding (Clydesdale), the emotional touch (the reunion)…it makes for a solid one-time effort, suitable for this big stage Super Bowl screening. The only thing I found truly lame is the gratuitous social media nonsense shoe-horned into the end. Way to bring down the emotion and turn things really pedestrian, guys! (sigh). – Business Class Cabin

23. Taco Bell – Viva Young

It’s a little weird to see grannie doing all of these things, and the mind remembers it even worse than what was shown (were they doing lines of coke at one point or am I just remembering it that way?) But, this ad will be both noticed and remembered, and that’s a critical breakthrough on this big stage. And despite the shock factor of octogenarian tattoos, do you know what the true touch of genius in this ad is? The music. Having Fun perform “We are Young” is not just cool, it’s genius. It’s what elevates this ad two notches right from second 3. Kudos to those who tinker, and are not satisfied with a smash hit that fits just right, kudos to those who figure it should be sung (in a so-bad-it’s-brilliant performance) by the same band. That’s creativity. Alas, buried away deep somewhere among all this madness is Taco Bell and the food.  This brand hasn’t earned the right to make a “manifesto” film with barely a mention of product…so this is a demerit – but nonetheless a distinguished effort. – Business Class Cabin

24. Sketchers – Man vs Cheetah

Meh. Not bad, but not great, which means it’s entirely forgettable unless you happen to love nature documentaries about cheetahs. This is an idea that doesn’t feel fresh, I don’t know for sure but it feels like something that would have been done before 100 times. The special effects are pretty pedestrian, and the humor is not consistent. On the plus side, you have a credible product benefit showcased in an interesting manner. Not bad. But overall, this one will pass like a ship in the night, even more so than the bad ads that people will talk about for being so terrible. – Coach Class Cabin

25. Lincoln – Phoenix

The car category is really tough, especially if you want to make an ad about an actual car (and not some grander statement like Chrysler did last year, for example). So I have mucho respect for those who toil away at this under such tough odds. Basically, you either have a cool looking car, or you (most often) don’t. If you don’t, you can either make the windy road ad and be forgotten instantly, or do something really creative and take a gamble. Either way, tough gig. Now, if you have a cool-looking car, you can do whatever you want. Worst case scenario you’ll be mildly interesting, best case scenario you’ll awaken desire. Here Lincoln has a car that looks pretty decent, so I expect people took note for about 30 seconds. The jazz drummer and all the rest was background noise, but that big sun roof? That was pretty cool. Either way, halfway through the following commercial you will have forgotten about this one. – Coach Class Cabin

26. Jeep – Whole Again

Wow. For starters I’ll say that in these big “cultural manifesto” type ads, timing is key. Last year the Chrysler ad blew everyone away (myself included) because the US was in the midst of a painful-yet-hopeful sense of having hit rock bottom. It was a message superbly calibrated to its time. This year, GM goes back to that same patriotic/emotional well, but I feel the country moved on. Things have continued to slowly improve, there is a little more optimism, a little more room for a lighter message. And…yet…goddammit this ad broke me. I tried to resist the overt and flagrant attempt to manipulate my emotions! They threw the kitchen sink at me: the concentrated Americana imagery, the emotive Oprah narration, the soaring Hans-Zimmer styled score, the always-powerful “family-reunion-after-long-separation” theme, the naked patriotism, etc. Everything but puppies. And…in the end…they got me! First 30 seconds I was in full hipster-cynic mode. By second 60 my defenses were down. By 1:20 I felt a lump. By 1:40 I felt a tear. No expense was spared here, and it worked…I guess. Attention-grabbing, statement-making, tastefully-branded, emotionally-filled. So there’s that. Powerful, and ultimately somewhat effective…but I do feel quite used and manhandled by this ad, to be honest. (and I predict the non-US readers at Adboardingpass will kind of hate this ad). – Business Class Cabin

27. Century 21 – Wedding

I had to watch this twice because I couldn’t believe how awful this ad was, how utterly void of any redeeming quality it is. I’m not going to waste too many words on this one, because there’s nothing to say. But I am genuinely mystified about how an ad this bad gets made, especially for such a big showcase. I mean, I work in advertising, I understand the process, and I fail to see how something this bad can make it from start to finish. I’ve seen so many great ideas fall along the way, which consumers will never see. Yet this sophomoric mediocrity is a Super Bowl ad? I can’t believe a proper agency and marketing team were involved, I’ve got to assume that Century 21 is owned by a reclusive and eccentric billionaire that wrote and directed this on their own.Baggage Cargo Hold

28. Blackberry 10 – Can’t Do

Ummm, no, wrong. If you think about it a bit, sure, it makes sense. But in the fast flow of the commercial break, this is a comprehension mess. The whole time you’re trying to figure out how the action matches up with a feature of the phone…so it’s a wasted opportunity to figure out at the end that none of this has anything to do with the phone. Poor strategy, poor creative idea, decent enough execution, semi-decent visual entertainment of no lasting benefit to the brand that sponsored it. It all amounts to a completely mediocre (and thus forgettable) mess. – Coach Class Cabin

29. E-Trade – Save it

Wow. This campaign idea was once cute, different and interesting. That time has long, long since passed. What a mess this is. Atrocious (10th-grader-on-a-Mac) execution, a muddled message, painfully unfunny story. A mess. I haven’t read the reviews, but if this ends up being a popular ad, it will speak poorly for the American viewing public. – Baggage Cargo Hold

30. Subway – FebruANY

See, advertising doesn’t have to be a technically sophisticated thing. This is a completely lame ad that ends up actually working, despite itself. The spontaneous blooper-style clips humanize the celebrities and make them relatable. And the concept of Februany is kind of ridiculous, but the tongue-twister IS the joke here, and it relates well to the product and the offer. Not Super Bowl caliber in terms of ambition (this could run any week, any day, any time), but an honest effort, at least. – Coach Class Cabin

31. Bud Light – Lucky Chair

I hated the previous ad in this series (No. 15). This one is a bit of a jumbled mess, but it had enough elements to make it a passable experience. Why jumbled? Stevie Wonder appearing at the end seemed to come out of nowhere, and the whole lucky-chair-actually-cursed thing forced you to retroactively remember the whole commercial. Way too complicated for a Bud Light ad. Here’s where I thought they were going: a humorous, beautifully shot narrative about the extent guys will go to take their lucky chair with them to a game. Warm, real, relatable, simple. That would have been enough, and then it got all crazy with Stevie, the hot girl, voodoo, etc (this is one case where they would have been better served by having 1/5 the budget. Their need to make this “big” made them lose focus).  – Coach Class Cabin

32. Axe Apollo – Bodyguard

This ad wants to be great: great brand strategy, funny premise, sexy shots, tongue-in-cheek, surprise twist, etc. So let me tell you why it doesn’t work: it has such an aching desire to be “social”, to be bigger than just an ad, to “continue the conversation”…that in the end it doesn’t seal the narrative deal. It doesn’t really deliver the joke! And that is a crime. Memo to the industry, it’s ok to save the last 5% of an ad to lead elsewhere, as long as we’re happy by the ad and the next place sounds interesting. But if you reserve the last 30%, leave us completely hanging, and expect us to go find the closer elsewhere…it’s too much. Nobody cares enough to go to the web and read up on your super clever Astronaut scheme, even if you’re Axe. We wanted to see the hot girl do something with the guy on the beach, forget your astronaut! Wasted potential. Sigh.Coach Class Cabin

33. MiO Fit – Change

I’m starting to despair. This ad is entirely mediocre, relying almost exclusively on your love (or not) for Tracy Morgan and his style of rambling. I happen to like it, but much like the Best Buy ad with Amy Poehler (No. 7) it is 95% Tracy Morgan, not-enough-percent product. The linkage comes too late, and without a compelling, persuasive reason (Sports drinks are too boring? Says who? Since when? If that’s your whole strategy, oh boy…). I enjoyed your Tracy so thank you for the entertainment. Because of it, I’m going to be a bit generous and give you an upgrade, because as an ad for an actual product, this is a fail.Coach Class Cabin

34. Kia Forte – Hotbots

An ad with nice enough execution can keep your attention. Here the set design, the crisp sci-fi lighting, and the hotbot are all first-rate, and make you lean forward. Sadly there was no real idea behind it, no story, the ad wasn’t sufficiently branded, it didn’t touch you in any meaningful way (it wasn’t even funny) it was just…ok. Empty calories, basically. Made for an amusing 30 seconds or so, a good background as you dipped into the salsa and grabbed another beer. But will you remember that it was for Kia Forte, or even for Kia? No you won’t. Maybe you’ll remember that it was for a blue car. Not enough. As I said earlier, those in the automotive industry have it real hard when it comes to advertisingCoach Class Cabin

 

Click here for part 3!

2 thoughts on “Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 2 of 3)

  1. Pingback: Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 1 of 3) | adboardingpass

  2. Pingback: Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 3 of 3) | adboardingpass

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