Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 3 of 3)

CaptureEvery one of the ads. If it was awesome, it’s here. If it sucked, it’s also here.

Click here for part 1 and here for part 2

We’ve come to part 3. Our hope is that some ads will reach the greatness levels of last year, because so far…we have fallen well short.

35. Gildan T Shirts – Getaway

I liked this one. It made me smile, it was visually interesting, it had a good buildup to the joke, and the t-shirt was the catalyst of the action, and the key prop in the punchline. Nicely done. Alas the key flaw here was branding, which came in too late and too weakly. In fairness I don’t know how they could have gotten it in early in a way that was credible, but it’s a problem. Imagine this ad from Fruit of the Loom and it would be a great Super Bowl ad. But since this ad comes from…what was the name again?? Exactly. – Coach Class Cabin

36. Wonderful Pistachios – PSY Get Crackin’

Uff. You see, when you try to ride the wave of pop-culture, timing is everything. Release this ad 4 months ago on some big-stage viewing event, and you’re the genius. Today…it’s starting to feel very tired, very sell-out. Yes, it’s entertaining, yes it’s pretty cool to see PSY humping the pistachio with wild abandon, yes it makes you smile. It’s tongue-in-cheek, unabashedly so, and that has its charm. Not enough to make it great, probably enough to make it ok in this context. I’m upgrading with much skepticism based on assured recall, but more than anything I do it because it looks like we’re over-booked on Coach. – Business Class Cabin

37. Lincoln – Once Upon a Tweet

No. I tell you what does work here – the car looks pretty cool. That actually means a lot, and catches my interest. The rest? Garbage. A whole ad made about some tweets, with the hope that you’ll go check out the back-story. It’s nonsense. Marketing people and agencies talking to each other in a circular hell of social media clichés. They and maybe their family members will be the only ones that will wish to “continue this conversation”, which is so completely uninteresting to real consumers, and completely unconnected to the product (this could have been done for literally any product). Really, really bad. And it’s a shame, because they have a cool looking car – Baggage Cargo Hold

38. Speedstick – Unattended Laundry

This ad is a monument to predictability, a love song to cliché, and a celebration of happy mediocrity. Really nothing there. I get it, the product benefit and all, but the mundane scenario and dialogue are just too much to overcome. And by the way, after underwhelming me so much with your non-entertainment, don’t even ask me for a tweet. Not going to happen. – Coach Class Cabin

39. Beck’s Sapphire – No Diggity

Context matters, and after so many bad ads in a row, I kind of like this one quite a bit! I can’t put my finger on it exactly, but the components were there. Cool looking bottle, respectable brand for a premium message, funky mood, funky tune, crazy fish…Call me crazy, but it was ok. Not Super Bowl topping ok, not I-will-remember-this-brand ok, but a decent enough 30 seconds. – Coach Class Cabin

40. RAM Trucks – Farmer

Ok, then, finally! This is a “statement” ad. They took a risk of going overboard (but they took the risk!), and with much more grace and distinctiveness than the Jeep ad, I think they nailed it, and delivered a beautiful, lasting statement that could really help re-define this brand if they choose to pursue it. Beautifully written, did you notice the cadence, the ebbs and flows of the words? During portions I didn’t even understand what was being said, as it was too fast and I’m not familiar with the terminology – but it didn’t matter. Beautifully shot. Solemn yet hopeful. Nostalgic yet forward-looking. Targeted yet universal (this is for the farmer in all of us). An ad with a point of view. An ad beautifully crafted. An ad that touches the emotions. And you know what – it wasn’t branded until the very end but it still works for Dodge, because the link is very credible and easy to accept, and also people repay their enjoyment by acknowledging the maker. Really, really good. Hats off. – First Class Cabin

41. KIA – Space Babies

It’s interesting that this follows the RAM truck ad. Here we’ve got a really interesting story, told in a pretty fantastic manner. The Babylandia segment is both interesting, somewhat funny, cute, and really well produced – it’s like a Hollywood movie. But alas, they don’t land the plane and link it to KIA! I know they tried it (by having the voice activated radio play the song on command..) but nobody is going to notice that after having such a vivid image in their head a few seconds ago. And because there is no credible link between the story of Babylandia and KIA, none is registered, and no one will remember who this ad was for – while they’ll remember the baby piglets just fine. They had a strong hand and played it really badly. – Coach Class Cabin

42. Tide – Miracle Stain

A mixed-bag effort here (successfully jumping over a hurdle, failing at another and not even attempting yet a third )that I nonetheless enjoyed. And enjoyment is that key and initial hurdle. Without it people won’t notice you, won’t remember you, and your ad will pass like a ship in the night. I thought the miracle Montana stain idea was kooky, yet also somewhat believable and definitely relevant. It worked for me, and I enjoyed how they drew it out into an over-the-top narrative. Alas I think they failed to connect it enough to Tide – the connective “joke” was too small for the buildup that preceded it, and it just didn’t stick. Thus, it’s probably best they didn’t even attempt to touch you emotionally, because it’s likely they would have failed. Could have been more, but it was a nice, solid effort. – Business Class Cabin

43. Sodastream – Effect

One must give credit here because this is a brand that seemingly out of nowhere arrives at the big advertising stage and tries to make a big statement with a well-produced ad and a decent enough idea behind it in “if you love the bubbles, set them free”. And yet, I fear they just don’t nail the landing. It’s interesting to watch, especially the part about the exploding bottles. But it’s difficult to connect the dots fully in your head – how do you liberate the bubbles if indeed what you are doing is making carbonated drinks at home? Isn’t it just a different way to do the same thing? And, as ingrained as Coke and co. are in our lives, do we really think their product is so easy to “manufacture” by alternative means? And…why should I bother? You get my drift. There’s something there, and it could even be revolutionary – but when it takes a 20 slide Powerpoint to sell you on it, it’s not simple enough. I’d say these guys had a solid 30 seconds, did an honest best, but didn’t surpass the extremely high benchmark they set for themselves. – Coach Class Cabin

44. Mercedes-Benz – Soul

Ah, yes. I love this ad. Exquisitely produced, and oozing opulence (superb casting, epic soundtrack…nothing came cheap, all of it worthwhile). But in the end, it only truly works because a)there’s a great product truth (value for money) conveyed through a clever twist, b)there’s a great looking product front and center throughout, and c)the story is entertaining to watch, once you start you can’t take your eyes off the screen. The money is justified by the idea…the idea is amplified with the money. That’s how you make a good Superbowl ad. A well deserved selection as our Ad of the Day back on February 1. – First Class Cabin.

45. Samsung – The Next Big Thing

This ad is almost cheating. I mean, you some of the top comedic film talent of today (plus a LeBron cameo!), and you just tell them to have fun and improvise. Probably shot hours of film and then edited it down to a long-form ad. If you had described this to me I would have predicted a disaster, or at best a funny 2 minutes with no benefit to the product itself. And I would have been wrong. Against big odds I think they just crushed it. Funny, engaging, and with the product and brand credibly woven into the narrative. It’s the kind of extravagant, over-the-top concept comes to life with money is no object (Samsung smells blood in the water and they want to redouble their efforts vs Apple), and talented creative people are allowed to do their thing while everyone else gets out of the way. It’s really quite simple to describe, but so hard to pull off: Something to catch your attention (celebrities), an interesting story (their passive-aggressive dialogue), and the product credibly integrated in a manner that is important to the story. Loved this, my hats off for the courage involved in bringing pulling it off successfully. – First Class Cabin

46. Pepsi Next – Party

Poor Pepsi. They’re that guy that tries so damn hard. You want them to do well, to reward the effort. But in the end, it’s just…ok. Take this ad for example. The idea (parents returning early during a party) has been done to death, but they try to execute it well, and even aim high with some nice touches (the guy pouring the gallon of milk over his head is out-there enough to be funny, as is the random “baaa” of a sheep when the music dies out). But it’s hard for this idea to escape the gravitational pull of a brand, and a product (60% less? is that supposed to be a lot when Coke promises the same benefit with 0 calories?) that is just…not…ready to win the big game. Nice enough, that’s about it. – Coach Class Cabin

And there you have it folks – All 46 ads, not counting movie trailers. Looks they saved the good stuff for the end of the game, I wonder if it was on purpose? Check back tomorrow for closing thoughts and our top 5!

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One thought on “Super Bowl ads 2013 – the Adboardingpass review! (part 3 of 3)

  1. Como siempre, impecable trabajo el tuyo! Te felicito Martin. (Deberías hacer este blog en castellano…)
    Solo dos comentarios, ambos sobre el comercial de Mercedez Benz. 1) Esa idea se hizo en lo ’90 en Argentina. Igual. Con increíble suceso. No puedo creer que los que participaron en este trabajo la desconocieran. 2) Me llama la atención que una marca como MB hable de beneficios y no de atributos. Se supone que es el mejor auto del mundo.
    Un abrazo grande desde las pampas!

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